About Silver Linings

“Silver Linings,” a feature about life after retirement. If you are a retiree with an interesting story about your new life or know of someone who fits the bill, email your suggestion to editorial@cjn.org and include “Silver Linings” in the subject line or tweet us at @CleveJN.

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After the death of his mother when he was 3 years old, South Euclid resident Herb Resnick’s father brought him everywhere with him – even to volunteer activities. Getting exposed to these experiences early set the course of his life – both civically and professionally.

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While working as a teacher, Steve Goodman was helping his community by educating generations of children at The Lillian and Betty Ratner School. Once he retired, finding he had a lot of extra time, Goodman decided to help in the community in a new way – through volunteering.

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Following a long career in health care, Gail Sands was determined to find another way to help her community while in retirement. She turned to volunteerism – something she had done since childhood but now had more time for.

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Long before Elizabeth (Lee) Warshawsky retired, she was a volunteer through and through. Out in her community while still punching the clock, it only made sense for her to continue that endeavor into her retirement.

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When Hazel Brown retired in 2012 from her career as a human resources manager, she already had the people-centric skills that you would need when volunteering.

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With only two years of retirement under her belt, Cindy Friedman is still figuring out how she’d like to spend the rest of it. But what she does know is she likes volunteering – especially with groups focused on animal adoption like the Geauga Humane Society’s Rescue Village and BREW Beagles.

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When Dave Sheinbart retired in 2013, he found himself waking up every morning wondering how to fill his newfound free time. Seven years later, he found community initiatives to do just that.

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After retiring in 1995, Denise Butvin found she had a lot of time on her hands. Going from a busy schedule as a pharmacy tech at Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital, she realized she needed to find something else to fill her days.

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Working as a medical technologist, Natalie Skall found herself pulled in many directions – filling in where she was needed. All of the time she spent at the office left her little time to do anything after work. She held many roles at several hospitals and labs, and at one hospital, she was …