Richard S. Mitchell went to law school at the encouragement of his father to pursue a profession. While he might not have had a burning desire to be a lawyer since he was a child, he said he’s been able to thrive in his career.

As a shareholder at Roetzel & Andress in Cleveland, Mitchell focuses his practice on complex business litigation, including shareholder disputes, securities litigation, Lanham Act violations and emergency injunctions in non-competes and trade secrets. He’s also been a lead trial counsel for cases in state and federal courts in Ohio and throughout the country.

A graduate of Case Western Reserve University School of Law in Cleveland, Mitchell has stayed interested in business litigation for his 35-year career for its ability to stay fresh. 

“Business litigation is interesting from a stand point that you end up learning lots of different businesses and sustenance areas instead of being in certain areas like if you were in (medical malpractice),” he said. “Business litigation, in my mind, keeps it fresh because the facts are always very different in every case and you often are tending to learn about somebody’s business or products or things of that nature. ... Plus we’re in lots of different sustenance areas of law, so my cases range from anything from breach of contract cases to security class action to shareholder dispute (or) intellectual property dispute, so it runs pretty broad.”

Mitchell chalks up each of his wins as the proudest moments of his career, because that’s what he’s hired to do. However, like many in his line of work, the challenges of juggling different cases and the stress of fighting with everybody involved in the case – including opponents, judges and sometimes colleagues and clients – can get to him. To overcome that extra stress, he said, he tries to work with good people that are able to assist him and he exercises. 

“I suppose (working out is) an outlet for relieving stress and meeting new people,” he said. “Originally, I started about 11 years ago when my kids were in about fifth and seventh grade, working out with a professional trainer and we were doing weight lifting. And over time, that’s expanded to running, more recently swimming. But from that we’ve done Tough Mudders and other triathlons and other competitions.” 

While he started working out to have more face time with his kids, its also been a way for him to bridge his stress reliever with his professional life. He serves on the Mandel Jewish Community Center of Cleveland’s board of trustees and also serves on its executive committee. In this role, he said he’s able to incorporate his Jewish background as well.

“I take my work talents and try to incorporate them to helping in the JCC,” he said. “Being on the executive committee and on the board, we’re faced with long-term business challenges and, specifically, I help on governance areas.”      

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