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Sudan announced on Saturday that it had signed an agreement with the United States that could potentially prevent any further compensation claims from being filed against it in U.S. courts.

According to an AP report, Sudan’s Justice Minister Minister Nasredeen Abdulbari said the deal, signed on Friday, allows his country “to resolve historical liabilities, restore normal relations with the United States, and move forward toward democracy and better economic times.”

Sudan’s government has paid $335 million to compensate victims of attacks carried out by al-Qaeda under Osama bin Laden when he was based in Sudan. This includes the 1998 bombings of the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania and the 2000 bombing of the USS Cole in Yemen, which killed 17 Marines. It also includes the murder of John Granville, who was working with the U.S. Agency of International Development and was shot in Khartoum in 2008, the report said.

The deal signed on Friday was part of a larger agreement to remove Sudan from the U.S. list of state sponsors of terrorism.

The post Report: Sudan signs agreement with US halting further compensation claims appeared first on JNS.org.

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